Cancer Data Science Pulse

The Cancer Data Science Pulse blog provides insights on trends, policies, initiatives, and innovation in the data science and cancer research communities from professionals dedicated to building a national cancer data ecosystem that enables new discoveries and reduces the burden of cancer.

"We are on the cusp of breakthroughs that will save lives, benefit all of humanity. But we have to work together." Vice President Joe Biden's words at the American Association for Cancer Research conference resonate as a clear call to action. When we collaborate and share our expertise, the cancer informatics community can bring a formidable wealth of knowledge and crucial skills to drive and facilitate cancer research.

The Seven Bridges Cancer Genomics Cloud (CGC) is one of three pilot systems funded by the National Cancer Institute with the aim of co-localizing massive genomics data sets, like The Cancer Genomics Atlas (TCGA), alongside secure and scalable computational resources for analysis.

To kick off the recent Cancer Informatics for Cancer Centers (CI4CC) Spring Symposium, we had the pleasure of organizing a workshop about "The Role of Academic Technology Development in Cancer Research." The goal of the workshop was to discuss the role of academic informatics technology in cancer research, with an emphasis on technology developed through the Information Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) program.

The NCI Data Catalog is a consolidated listing of the publicly available data collections produced by NCI initiatives.

There has been a lot of press in the past couple of months about the "Cancer Moonshot," first mentioned by Vice President Joe Biden in October 2015, and gaining steam recently with the President's State of the Union address and an initial recommendation of $1 billion of funding. The White House released a Fact Sheet highlighting the exciting and transformative goals of the Moonshot.

We have all been hearing about the benefits of cloud computing for a long time now. At the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB), we believe that 2016 is the year in which a cloud-based approach will truly become "the new normal" for cancer research.

As the FY 2017 Annual Plan and Budget Proposal describes, some of the key components of the infrastructure and programs that comprise the National Cancer Program include:

My previous post highlighted how the imaging community is leveraging NCIP Hub's capabilities to run its image analysis needs and to collaborate on tool development. This post discusses how the NCI plans to use NCIP Hub to address the need for robust, reliable translational use of mouse and human-in-mouse models.

Researchers are using 3D printing to gain insights that contribute to advances in basic biomedical research and the development of precision medical therapies by creating 3D models of pathogens, tumors, normal tissues, cells, and biomolecules. Dr. Sriram Subramaniam, principal investigator in the Laboratory of Cell Biology at the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR), uses 3D printing as both an educational and a research tool.