Cancer Data Science Pulse

The Cancer Data Science Pulse blog provides insights on trends, policies, initiatives, and innovation in the data science and cancer research communities from professionals dedicated to building a national cancer data ecosystem that enables new discoveries and reduces the burden of cancer.

The data science community is awash with "FAIRness." In the past few years, there has been an emerging consensus that scientific data should be archived in open repositories, and that the data should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable.

I recently joined NCI to help support strategic data sharing and informatics projects within the Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT). Having worked on information management at another Institute for five years and the trans-NIH

Biomedical research is evolving with an increasing emphasis on data science, e.g.,

In recent years, genomics has been described as a big data science on par with the likes of Twitter, YouTube, and the scientific pursuit of understanding the universe.

Precision medicine has quickly moved to the forefront of clinical research and practice, and is particularly pertinent to cancer since cancer is a disease of the genome.

The recent weeks have been momentous as the high-performance computing (HPC) community embraced the challenge of precision medicine.

These days there seems to be a lot of talk about atlases for cancer. Most of us are familiar with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the long-running effort which, over the past decade, sequenced genomes from thousands of tumor samples covering dozens of cancer types. TCGA catalogued the complex patterns of gene mutations underlying tumors, implicated numerous new cancer genes, and is generally viewed as a resounding success.

Scientific discovery involves collecting and analyzing data, and communicating new knowledge arising therefrom. What happens, though, when someone wants to repeat an experiment, or build on an existing approach? For this to happen, there needs to be sufficient information in the public domain and data that is accessible and understandable to the scientist.

In recent years, Challenges have become a popular way to engage and motivate the research and innovation communities to solve difficult problems. Challenges are open competitions where communities are presented with specific and often difficult problems to solve. Participants are given guidelines and test data, and are challenged to compete to find the best solution. Open competition encourages innovative thinking, provides for broad participation, allows funders to set ambitious goals, and is a cost-effective way to encourage collaboration and generate novel solutions.

The cost of DNA sequencing has dropped more than one million-fold over the last decade, making it increasingly possible to discover the genetic basis of cancer and response to treatment.