News

Keep up with the latest news from the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) and the data science communities.

The latest release from NCI’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services includes updates to SeroNet terminology, childhood neoplasm terminologies, as well as other standalone terminologies, ontologies, and mappings.

Funding can be used to support data preparation for inclusion in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Data Ecosystem.

The latest updates for NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services include terminology sets for NCI’s Genomic Data Commons, CDISC’s Digital Data Flow project, and a new edition of the NCI Metathesaurus.

A new $14 million project, funded by NIH’s Bridge2AI program, is turning the traditional biomarker concept on its ear. Instead of examining genetic or similar molecular characteristics, researchers are collecting data to look for voice biomarkers that can be linked to cancer.

Learn more about NCI’s Request for Information and contribute to the conversation around cancer metabolomics data.

NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services published the latest updates to NCI Thesaurus, which includes data supporting osteosarcoma for the Pediatric Cancer Data Commons and a new value set containing COVID-19 vocabulary.

Updates to NCIt, NCIm, and other terminologies/ontologies have been published and are now available. These resources, managed and maintained by NCI CBIIT’s Enterprise Vocabulary Service Team, promote harmonization and shared data standards. This latest update includes new data terms for the Pediatric Cancer Data Commons and the Integrated Canine Data Commons.

CBIIT Director, Dr. Tony Kerlavage, sat down recently for a podcast examining the evolution of NCI’s Data Commons. He tracked the development of the Cancer Research Data Commons, from its early pilots to today’s cloud-based infrastructure, with repositories of diverse data and more than 1,000 tools and resources.

Check out the latest quarterly updates made to terminologies and ontologies developed and maintained by NCI’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) including the NCI Thesaurus and the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium’s (CDISC’s) controlled terminology. EVS content developed in collaboration with CDISC, FDA, NCI programs, and other stakeholders is an indispensable component of NCI’s informatics infrastructure. EVS not only plays a critical role in federal and global data standards but also provides services to accurately code, analyze, and share cancer and biomedical research.

In a recent podcast, NCI leaders from CBIIT and the Small Business Innovation Research Development Center shared how technological developments have enhanced cancer research and have helped usher in new diagnostics, treatments, and patient care.